Kay Granger

Kay Granger

TEXAS' 12th DISTRICT

Granger Statement on Speaker Jim Wright's Passing

2015/05/06

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12) released the following statement after former Speaker of the House Jim Wright passed away earlier today.    

“Speaker Jim Wright’s footprint in Fort Worth and North Texas is large. He was instrumental in projects that helped build this state and particularly North Texas to the prominent place it holds today. He helped save the Historic Stockyards District and authored the Wright Amendment which settled a bitter fight over DFW International Airport, allowing Fort Worth and Dallas to work together and share the economic growth largely credited to the success of the airport.”

“My thoughts and prayers go out to his family and I join with so many others in mourning the loss of a true giant who worked tirelessly on behalf of the people of Texas and the United States of America.”

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Jade Helm 15

2015/04/30

Dear Friend,

As many of you might have heard, there will be a military exercise involving about 1,200 service-members occurring from July to September. Known as “Jade Helm 15,” this military training operation is being planned and executed by the U.S. Army Special Operations Command and will take place in seven western states, including Texas.

The U.S. military routinely conducts training exercises in the U.S. and around the world with our allies overseas. With the nature of warfare constantly changing, it is important to make sure that our elite warriors are trained, equipped and organized to successfully conduct worldwide operations in support of America’s security interests.

I know there has been some concern expressed by Texans because the upcoming training missions cite several states, including Texas, as “hostile” territory for the purpose of these training exercises. This is not an official designation and is solely for the purpose of the training exercise. The designation has led some to believe the incursion of martial law will be enforced on the citizens of Texas. I want you to know that these rumors are entirely false.

However, it is critically important that the military works with local officials to ensure the training missions are operated in a safe manner and the rights of Texans are not infringed upon during this period of time. These sort of military exercises have been conducted safely in the past and I am confident that will continue to be the case here, but it is important there is an open line of communication so that everyone is aware of what is going to be taking place inside our state.

As I learn more details about the training exercises and the impact it will have on Texas, I will be sure to pass information along to you. Sincerely,   Kay Granger Member of Congress

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President George W. Bush Honored at Dallas Event for Historic Malaria Progress

2015/04/20

Dallas – President George W. Bush was honored at a gala last night in Dallas for his unprecedented commitment in the fight against malaria. President Bush was given the Global Leadership Award by Malaria No More in recognition of the pioneering role that he played in founding the President’s Malaria Initiative and supporting the Global Fund, which together have contributed to more than 4.3 million lives saved and 670 million malaria cases averted since 2000.  

“I am honored to receive this award from Malaria No More tonight and I thank the American people for their generosity and leadership which has saved millions of lives and set us on the path toward achieving a world without malaria,” said President Bush in Freedom Hall of the George W. Bush Presidential Center. “I am confident that with renewed focus and determination, we can finish the job, and ensure that no child dies from a mosquito bite.”

The event also honored ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson and Kimberly-Clark CEO Tom Falk for their contributions to the global malaria effort. ExxonMobil has been involved for more than a decade in the fight against malaria, through its employees and operations in Africa, committing over $120 million to the cause. Malaria No More’s partnership with Kimberly-Clark, and its Huggies diaper brand, began in Kenya last year delivering 400,000 live-saving malaria treatments and reaching millions of Kenyan mothers with health education.

Admiral Tim Ziemer, who leads the President’s Malaria Initiative and serves as the U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator, attended the gala and presented on the progress to date. Texas Congresswoman Kay Granger, who has been instrumental in preserving funding for critical U.S. foreign aid global-health programs, also spoke at the gala. As Chairwoman of the House State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee, she emphasized the importance of continuing to effectively fund these important programs. The event, held in advance of World Malaria Day on April 25, also acknowledged the work that remains.

“President Bush was a man of action during his presidency. The initiatives he championed were groundbreaking at the time and the results today are undeniable,” said Congresswoman Kay Granger. “The President’s Malaria Initiative has been extraordinary successful. The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief have changed the way the U.S. invests in worldwide challenges like Malaria and other diseases that can be prevented and cured.”

The President’s Malaria Initiative, founded a decade ago under the leadership of President Bush, has distributed over 140 million mosquito nets, procured 318 million antimalarial treatments and over 174 million rapid diagnostic tests. This and other efforts have helped decrease malaria deaths by nearly 50 percent since 2000. Malaria, one of the world’s oldest, deadliest and costliest diseases, still takes the life of a child nearly every minute.

“The strides that have been made in fighting malaria would not have been possible without the leadership and vision of President Bush,” said Martin Edlund, CEO of Malaria No More. “We are thrilled to have continued that progress under President Obama and we are excited to see that people from both sides of the aisle are committed to the cause.”

For more information about Malaria No More and efforts to eradicate the disease, visit www.malarianomore.org/.

###

The gala was closed to the press but photos and other assets are available at www.malarianomore.org/

Contact: Dena GudaitisDena.Gudaitis@malarianomore.org (202) 999-2034

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Your Taxes

2015/04/16

Dear Friend,

Over the last year many of us, especially from the Texas Congressional delegation, have been pushing to make permanent the state and local sales tax deduction. We were successful in having a temporary solution signed into law in December to prevent a tax increase on Texans, but that was only a short-term fix.

In Texas, and several other states, since we don’t have a state income tax, we have been able to deduct state and local sales taxes when filing our federal income tax returns. This has provided some parity with other states who can deduct their state and local income taxes when filing their returns. However, the deduction is currently not permanent and that has provided a lot of uncertainty to millions of Texas taxpayers who are concerned about whether or not their taxes could go up in the future.

In January, my colleague from Texas, Congressman Kevin Brady, who serves on the Ways and Means committee, which is the tax writing committee in the House, introduced the State and Local Sales Tax Deduction Fairness Act, H.R. 622. This bill, which I am an original co-sponsor, would make permanent the state and local sales tax deduction. Earlier today, this bill passed the House with bipartisan support. I am hopeful the Senate will take action on this bill soon, so that it can be sent to the President’s desk to be signed into law without further delay.

Additionally, this week, the House passed The Death Tax Repeal Act, also known as the estate tax. This is a 40 percent tax on an individual’s transfer of their assets to the next generation at the time of their death. This tax particularly hurts small businesses and family farms, which are passed from generation to generation to keep the businesses within the family. Also we passed several bills focused on preventing the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) from targeting individuals again like they have done in the past with conservative organizations.   Sincerely,   Kay Granger Member of Congress

P.S. I was honored to be recognized last week by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) for my efforts to combat illegal poaching and stop wildlife trafficking, specifically rhinos and elephants for their horns and tusks. These crimes have almost wiped out two of the most unique species we have on the plant. At the Fort Worth Zoo, we are fortunate to have on exhibit a Black Rhino and Asian Elephant, both of which are on the endangered species list. To read my op-ed in the Star-Telegram from last week, click here

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Granger Opening Statement: Budget Hearing - United Nations and International Organizations

2015/04/15

The Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs will come to order.

Ambassador Power, thank you for being here to testify. We have many important policy and budget issues to discuss with you today.

First, I would like to address the recent announcement of a framework agreement on Iran’s nuclear program. With each passing day, conflicting reports emerge about the parameters of this deal. I have serious concerns about promises that may have been made to lift sanctions on Iran and I hope you can address this issue today. The International Atomic Energy Agency has a critical role to play in implementing any agreement. Yet we all know Iran’s record of cooperating with the I.A.E.A. is not good. I hope you can help the committee understand why we should have confidence that Iran will live up to its commitments this time and allow the I.A.E.A. the access required.

I am also deeply disappointed by the hostile actions taken by the Palestinian Authority to join international bodies over the last year. Their steps at the International Criminal Court have put U.S assistance to the Palestinians in jeopardy. I am also very concerned about recent statements from Administration officials that suggest the United States is re-evaluating its approach to the peace process and reports that the U.S. may support a U.N. Security Council resolution laying out conditions and establishing deadlines. The Administration must send a clear message to the Palestinians that the only path to statehood is through a negotiated settlement with Israel.  

Concerns also remain about the U.N. Human Rights Council. I fear that the Council’s upcoming report on last year’s hostilities in Gaza will unfairly criticize Israel’s right to defend itself. There are Members of Congress who question why we should support the Council at all, and I welcome your comments on this issue.  

Regarding budget issues, the request includes a significant increase for accounts that fund the United Nations and other international organizations – approximately 25% higher than last year. Like many increases in the President’s request, this one is difficult for me to justify. The United States is by far the largest contributor to the U.N. and more work needs to be done to ensure that the U.N. has its budget under control. For example, U.N. peacekeeping costs have skyrocketed. The Administration should work with the U.N. to phase out peacekeeping missions when possible and lower the rate the United States pays for them.  

Madam Ambassador, you have committed to reform the U.N. and as you know, our appropriations bill contains strong transparency and accountability requirements. Some progress has been made, but many international organizations continue to fall short. After all of these years, there is simply no excuse for this.  

I look forward to your thoughts on all of these important issues. In closing, I want to thank you and the American delegations in New York and around the world for the work you do to advance U.S. interests.

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Granger addresses constituents’ questions

2015/04/13

By Kristen Tribe

Longtime Congresswoman Kay Granger spoke to a luncheon crowd of more than 100 Wednesday at the Decatur Civic Center.

Granger, first elected to represent the 12th Congressional District in 1997, is the only female Republican in the Texas delegation.

She recalled being asked at another event what it was like to be the only woman and “what do the men think?”

“They’re scared to death of me!” she said with a laugh.

Granger was once mayor of Fort Worth, and she’s a former teacher and small business owner. She represents the east side of Wise County, western Tarrant County and all of Parker County in Congress. Her counterpart, Mac Thornberry, represents the western side of Wise.

Granger is chairwoman of the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee and vice chair of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee. She also serves on the Energy and Water Appropriations Subcommittee.

Wednesday’s program was a Q&A with Messenger publisher Roy Eaton and questions submitted by the audience. Topics included immigration, ISIS, veterans and water, among others. Here is a sample of the questions she answered.

One of the major issues is the threat of ISIS. Give us your thoughts and where’s the end game in this battle?

“The Islamic extremists, their guiding message is to fight to the end of the world and destroy all infidels; an infidel is anyone who doesn’t believe the way they believe, and also to reestablish a caliphate, which is their land and property.

“If you follow that and watch what they’re doing with these individual terrorist organizations, they’re demanding they join ISIS.”

Granger went on to say that she’s been traveling in recent months and with a contingent visited with other countries to see what they will do to help in the battle against the terrorist organization.

What progress is being made to improve medical care, both mental and physical, for veterans today?

“In some cases we’re doing good work and in some we’re not at all doing what we should do for those who risked their lives, and their futures, to keep us safe.”

Granger said there was an issue with veterans not receiving care because some of their issues were considered pre-existing conditions, issues they had before war.

“We have to give care to those people, to men and women who served, and give the best care we can.”

Wise County has a significant Hispanic population. Tell us about the committee you chaired that visited the border to look into the children being brought across it.

Granger organized trips to see what was happening, and at that time there were about 50,000 children who had recently crossed with no family and no where to go.

She said one place had 1,200 children – 600 boys and 600 girls – and they had 72 hours to determine the status of their health before finding them a place to go.

Granger said they were doing nothing to determine where their families were located.

Her committee recommended these children be kept in facilities at the border instead of being shipped across the U.S. She visited Honduras, Guatamala and El Salvador, the countries with the most children here, and their government officials assure her that they wanted their children back.

They also visited with leaders about the problems in their countries that led to the children being sent to the U.S. alone.

She said so far, only 2,000 children have been returned to their home countries.

What do you see in the future of Wise County for water needs?

“Water is the new oil and what oil used to be. Communities really depend on a strong water supply, and every town, city and state is looking at that. I’m very confident about what’s happening here.”

Granger said she worked with the Oklahoma governor on an agreement between the two states to buy water not being used in our neighbor to the north, but in the end, it didn’t work out.

“The Oklahoma governor said, ‘I know it makes sense, but in this day and age you try to explain to citizens that you’re selling their water, even if you’re not using it, and it’s not going very far.”

You’re known for being accountable to your constituents. Can you elaborate on the importance of accountability of elected officials?

“I’ve always said that we all owe back to the community. There are people in this room that could do exactly what I’m doing, and I know this. You have allowed me to do it.

You’ve supported me, you’ve given me that responsibility and that trust, so I owe you 100 percent on everything – no less. I do try to do the very best job in everything I do.”

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Granger addresses constituents’ questions

2015/04/13

By Kristen Tribe

Longtime Congresswoman Kay Granger spoke to a luncheon crowd of more than 100 Wednesday at the Decatur Civic Center.

Granger, first elected to represent the 12th Congressional District in 1997, is the only female Republican in the Texas delegation.

She recalled being asked at another event what it was like to be the only woman and “what do the men think?”

“They’re scared to death of me!” she said with a laugh.

Granger was once mayor of Fort Worth, and she’s a former teacher and small business owner. She represents the east side of Wise County, western Tarrant County and all of Parker County in Congress. Her counterpart, Mac Thornberry, represents the western side of Wise.

Granger is chairwoman of the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee and vice chair of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee. She also serves on the Energy and Water Appropriations Subcommittee.

Wednesday’s program was a Q&A with Messenger publisher Roy Eaton and questions submitted by the audience. Topics included immigration, ISIS, veterans and water, among others. Here is a sample of the questions she answered.

One of the major issues is the threat of ISIS. Give us your thoughts and where’s the end game in this battle?

“The Islamic extremists, their guiding message is to fight to the end of the world and destroy all infidels; an infidel is anyone who doesn’t believe the way they believe, and also to reestablish a caliphate, which is their land and property.

“If you follow that and watch what they’re doing with these individual terrorist organizations, they’re demanding they join ISIS.”

Granger went on to say that she’s been traveling in recent months and with a contingent visited with other countries to see what they will do to help in the battle against the terrorist organization.

What progress is being made to improve medical care, both mental and physical, for veterans today?

“In some cases we’re doing good work and in some we’re not at all doing what we should do for those who risked their lives, and their futures, to keep us safe.”

Granger said there was an issue with veterans not receiving care because some of their issues were considered pre-existing conditions, issues they had before war.

“We have to give care to those people, to men and women who served, and give the best care we can.”

Wise County has a significant Hispanic population. Tell us about the committee you chaired that visited the border to look into the children being brought across it.

Granger organized trips to see what was happening, and at that time there were about 50,000 children who had recently crossed with no family and no where to go.

She said one place had 1,200 children – 600 boys and 600 girls – and they had 72 hours to determine the status of their health before finding them a place to go.

Granger said they were doing nothing to determine where their families were located.

Her committee recommended these children be kept in facilities at the border instead of being shipped across the U.S. She visited Honduras, Guatamala and El Salvador, the countries with the most children here, and their government officials assure her that they wanted their children back.

They also visited with leaders about the problems in their countries that led to the children being sent to the U.S. alone.

She said so far, only 2,000 children have been returned to their home countries.

What do you see in the future of Wise County for water needs?

“Water is the new oil and what oil used to be. Communities really depend on a strong water supply, and every town, city and state is looking at that. I’m very confident about what’s happening here.”

Granger said she worked with the Oklahoma governor on an agreement between the two states to buy water not being used in our neighbor to the north, but in the end, it didn’t work out.

“The Oklahoma governor said, ‘I know it makes sense, but in this day and age you try to explain to citizens that you’re selling their water, even if you’re not using it, and it’s not going very far.”

You’re known for being accountable to your constituents. Can you elaborate on the importance of accountability of elected officials?

“I’ve always said that we all owe back to the community. There are people in this room that could do exactly what I’m doing, and I know this. You have allowed me to do it.

You’ve supported me, you’ve given me that responsibility and that trust, so I owe you 100 percent on everything – no less. I do try to do the very best job in everything I do.”

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Appropriations Subcommittee Vice Chairs Named

2015/04/08

WASHINGTON, D.C. – House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers today announced the Republican Members who will serve as Vice Chairs of the 12 Appropriations subcommittees for the 114th Congress. These Members will serve as Chair of the subcommittee in the absence of the Chairperson, and assist them in official Committee duties.

“The Vice Chairs for the Appropriations Committee have distinguished themselves as knowledgeable on the appropriations process and are committee to responsible budgeting,” Chairman Rogers said. “These Members will play an integral role in bringing each of the 12 Appropriations bills from Subcommittee to the House floor, and I know that they will live up to the demands of the job over what I expect will be a tough but successful appropriations year.”

The Subcommittee Vice Chairs are as follows:

Agriculture: David Valadao, CaliforniaCommerce, Justice, Science: Robert Aderholt, AlabamaDefense: Kay Granger, TexasEnergy and Water: Chuck Fleischmann, TennesseeFinancial Services: Jaime Herrera Beutler, WashingtonHomeland Security: Rodney Frelinghuysen, New JerseyInterior and Environment: Mike Simpson, IdahoLabor, Health and Human Services, and Education: Steve Womack, ArkansasLegislative Branch: Mark Amodei, NevadaMilitary Construction and Veterans Affairs: Jeff Fortenberry, NebraskaState and Foreign Operations: Charlie Dent, PennsylvaniaTransportation, Housing and Urban Development: Kevin Yoder, Kansas

Contact: Jennifer Hing, (202) 226-7007

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North Texas Congresswoman Fights Terror, Saves Friendly Beasts

2015/04/08

By Jack Douglas Jr. Senior Investigative Producer, CBS 11 News April 7, 2015 11:08 AM

U.S. Rep. Kay Granger, a Fort Worth Republican, has been recognized for her work to fight the illegal poaching of wild animals throughout the world – a dangerous practice that she says can fund terrorism.

Rhinos and elephants, such as the ones you can see in North Texas zoos, are among the animals in danger of becoming extinct because thousands of them are being hunted down for their tusks and horns, said Granger, honored at the Fort Worth zoo by the World Wildlife Fund.

Granger, who is chairwoman of the State and Foreign Operations subcommittee in Congress, told CBS 11 News that the global killing of wildlife puts humans at risk as well.

As the international community works to close down bank accounts used by terrorists, the lucrative practice of poaching wildlife has been seen as a way to fund future attacks, experts fear.

Noting that a single elephant tusk has a black market price tag of $56,000, Granger, in a statement to CBS 11, said “the killing of just one middle-aged elephant” could have been enough to fund the deadly terrorist attacks in 1998 of the U.S. embassies in Nairobi and in Dar es Salaam – with $6,000 left over.

“This kind of black market financing is a real concern especially as criminal poaching networks become more sophisticated in the weapons and equipment they use to illegally poach rhinos and elephants for their ivory …,” Granger said in the statement.

Carter Roberts, president and CEO of World Wildlife Fund, said “the reason the U.S. has put serious money behind solving this problem is because a handful of people in our government are committed to addressing it …and none more so than Kay Granger.”

Roberts also said “the poaching of rhinos in South Africa has increased from a dozen rhinos killed in 2007 to over 1,200 last year – a 10,000 percent increase – all because of organized crime syndicates.”

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2015/04/07/north-texas-congresswoman-fights-terror-saves-friendly-beasts/

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Surge in demand for wildlife products spurs poaching

2015/04/08

By Kay Granger and Carter Roberts - Special to the Star-Telegram 04/07/2015 5:02 PM

In 2012, the Fort Worth Zoo celebrated the birth of an endangered greater one-horned rhinoceros — a first for Texas and a major milestone for the zoo.

That same year in South Africa, a different milestone was being marked: A record 668 rhinos were lost to poaching, a 5,000 percent increase in five years.

The poaching surge stems from a larger trend: the rise of global crime operations to feed growing demand in Asia for rhino horn, elephant ivory, tiger bone and other illegal wildlife products.

It was with this crisis as the backdrop that we first sat down three years ago to discuss working together to halt the worldwide explosion of wildlife crime.

We’ve both been fortunate to see these animals in the wild, and it’s a breathtaking experience.

Witnessing a herd of elephants and realizing that we could lose them makes the crisis very tangible. Once these animals are gone, they’re gone forever.

However, this is about more than wildlife conservation.

Poaching is nothing new, but its scope and severity are unprecedented. South Africa lost 1,215 rhinos to poaching in 2014 — double the number in 2012.

Militias in Central Africa have killed hundreds of elephants, including calves, in mere weeks. Continent-wide, 30,000 African elephants are being slaughtered annually.

Tusks become trinkets. Rhino horns become false cures for hangovers and cancer.

Surging demand makes some wildlife products as lucrative as narcotics.

Wildlife crime now generates $7-10 billion annually, the fifth-largest illicit transnational activity worldwide. High profits and low risks are too tempting to pass up, and it increasingly involves the same criminal networks smuggling arms, drugs and humans.

Intelligence confirms that the LRA, Al Shabaab, Sudanese militias and other armed groups also derive financing from illegal trade in natural resources, including ivory.

African wildlife that supports growing tourism economies is being liquidated into the currency of instability. Tusks are traded for guns, perpetuating conflict and fueling threats to our own security.

Conservation organizations can only do so much, so in 2012, the World Wildlife Fund launched its “Stop Wildlife Crime” campaign to mobilize political action.

The U.S. Congress has taken keen interest, providing resources to help countries protect their wildlife, improve law enforcement and dismantle criminal networks. These actions will strengthen our partners and protect America’s interests around the world.

We know this approach works. In Namibia, WWF and the U.S. government have helped create a model of community-run conservation that has brought rebounding wildlife populations, rising rural incomes and stronger local democracies.

In Nepal, WWF, CARE and USAID are helping communities manage their forests, protect their wildlife and improve their livelihoods.

Both countries have largely held poaching at bay. In 2014, Nepal celebrated its second year with zero poaching of rhinos, elephants or tigers — a remarkable accomplishment.

Much as investing in women and girls yields broader social benefits, helping communities conserve and manage natural resources promotes long-term growth and stability.

And preventing wildlife crime from financing America’s enemies just makes sense.

These programs are a tiny fraction of U.S. foreign assistance — itself less than 1 percent of the federal budget. For such modest investments, the return is huge.

The Fort Worth Zoo is doing its small part to protect species from half a world away, and the U.S. government has a role to play as well in helping countries like Namibia and Nepal build healthy, stable communities making wise use of their natural resources.

By doing so, we create global partners and increase their immunity to wildlife criminals and others who would undermine progress and threaten our own interests.

U.S. Rep. Kay Granger of Fort Worth has served the 12th Congressional District since 1997 and is a member of the House Appropriations Committee. Carter Roberts is the President and CEO of the World Wildlife Fund.

http://www.star-telegram.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/other-voices/article17769758.html#storylink=cpy

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2015-04-17 15:23:22


Contact Information

1026 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-5071
Fax 202-225-5683
kaygranger.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Appropriations

A former teacher, small business owner and Mayor of Fort Worth, Congresswoman Kay Granger was first elected to represent the 12th congressional district of Texas in 1997.  Earning a reputation for pragmatic leadership and serving as a powerful voice for Texas values, Kay fervently fights for the issues that matter most to Texas’ 12th congressional district and our country.

Since arriving in the U.S. House of Representatives, Kay has distinguished herself as one of the most recognized and influential leaders on defense and foreign policy – an expertise she began developing as the Mayor of Fort Worth, which is home to the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base and Lockheed Martin.  As a senior member of the powerful Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, she has continually strengthened the 12th District’s contribution to America’s defense system and supported efforts to provide for our women and men in uniform – both on the battlefield and when they return home from combat.

In 2012, Kay stood with Governor Rick Perry and members of the 136th Airlift Wing of the Texas Air National Guard to fight a costly and unnecessary Air Force proposal that looked to move Texas’ prized C-130 squadron to Montana.  To the Air Force, Texans, and the millions of Americans who depend on the C-130 aircraft to respond to natural disaster emergencies, Kay delivered a powerful message:  C-130s will not be moved without a fight.  Thanks to her work as well as that of Governor Perry, Senator Cornyn, Senator Hutchinson and the entire Texas delegation, the C-130’s stayed where they are needed and where they belong:  Fort Worth.

Kay has long believed that national security and foreign policy go hand in hand.  As the top Republican on the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee, she has worked to increase global stability and security as well enrich the lives of millions in the developing world through efforts that center on bettering global health, improving the lives of women and teaching emerging democracies how to sustain newly-discovered freedoms.

Kay is also a Majority Deputy Whip and serves on the Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development.

In recognition of her achievements, Kay has received the Air Force Foundation Award and the Marine Corps’ Semper Fidelis Award.  She has also been honored with the Tax Fighter Award by the National Tax Limitation Committee and the Spirit of Enterprise Award by the U.S. Chamber of Congress.  Additionally, the National Association of Manufacturers has recognized her for her pro-growth, pro-worker voting record.  For a full list of the awards she’s received, please click here.

Born in Greenville, TX, Kay was raised in Fort Worth.  Majoring in education, Kay – a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution – graduated from Texas Wesleyan University and became a high school journalism and English teacher.  In 1978, she opened her own insurance agency and operated it for over 20 years, leading her to become the first woman inducted into the Fort Worth Business Hall of Fame.  In 1991, she was elected as the first female Mayor of Fort Worth where she cut crime by 49 percent and led the city to win the coveted All-American City Award.  Kay, who attends the First United Methodist Church in Fort Worth, is a mother of three and a proud grandmother to five.


Serving With

Louie Gohmert

TEXAS' 1st DISTRICT

Ted Poe

TEXAS' 2nd DISTRICT

Sam Johnson

TEXAS' 3rd DISTRICT

John Ratcliffe

TEXAS' 4th DISTRICT

Jeb Hensarling

TEXAS' 5th DISTRICT

Joe Barton

TEXAS' 6th DISTRICT

John Culberson

TEXAS' 7th DISTRICT

Kevin Brady

TEXAS' 8th DISTRICT

Michael McCaul

TEXAS' 10th DISTRICT

Michael Conaway

TEXAS' 11th DISTRICT

Mac Thornberry

TEXAS' 13th DISTRICT

Randy Weber

TEXAS' 14th DISTRICT

Bill Flores

TEXAS' 17th DISTRICT

Randy Neugebauer

TEXAS' 19th DISTRICT

Lamar Smith

TEXAS' 21st DISTRICT

Pete Olson

TEXAS' 22nd DISTRICT

Will Hurd

TEXAS' 23rd DISTRICT

Kenny Marchant

TEXAS' 24th DISTRICT

Roger Williams

TEXAS' 25th DISTRICT

Michael Burgess

TEXAS' 26th DISTRICT

Blake Farenthold

TEXAS' 27th DISTRICT

John Carter

TEXAS' 31st DISTRICT

Pete Sessions

TEXAS' 32nd DISTRICT

Brian Babin

TEXAS' 36th DISTRICT

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