Diane Black

Diane Black

TENNESSEE's 6th DISTRICT

Rep. Black Hails Passage of Resolution to Block D.C. Anti-Religious Freedom Law

2015/05/01

Watch Congressman Black’s remarks in support of H.J. Res. 43 HERE or by clicking the image above 

Washington, DC– Today Congressman Diane Black (R-TN-06) released the below statement after the bipartisan passage of H.J. Res. 43, a resolution she authored to overturn the District of Columbia’s misnamed Reproductive Health Nondiscrimination Act (RHNDA). If not stopped by Congress, this unconstitutional measure could force pro-life organizations in D.C. to hire personnel that disagree with their mission and potentially pay for abortion in their healthcare plans.

“At its core, the Reproductive Health Nondiscrimination Act is perhaps the most discriminatory ‘nondiscrimination’ law we have seen to date. I am proud that the House took a stand for religious freedom and acted to protect the First Amendment rights of pro-life Washingtonians by passing my resolution to overturn RHNDA,” said Congressman Diane Black. “While this particular law only applies to the District of Columbia, it sets a dangerous precedent for future legislation that could further weaken our long-held tradition of respecting Americans’ conscience rights. I am pleased that despite the many outrageous mischaracterizations of this resolution from some of my colleagues across the aisle, the measure ultimately received bipartisan support – affirming that protecting religious freedom is not a Republican or Democrat value, it is an American value.”

Congressman Black added, “My resolution does not remove protections for employee privacy or create new rights for religious organizations, it simply maintains the status quo in Washington, D.C. before this ill-conceived law came to pass. Further, the resolution does not in any way condone discrimination against women for healthcare reasons or otherwise. Women are already rightfully protected from discrimination on the basis of pregnancy status and a number of other fronts through both D.C. and federal law. This resolution does nothing to change that. As a registered nurse, I have spent my career caring for women, children, and families. The claims that my resolution amounts to ‘an attack on women’s healthcare’ are offensive and patently false.”

Congressman Black concluded, “I know that we still face an uphill battle to stop the oppressive RHNDA law before the Congressional review period expires, but we are not giving up the fight. That is why I also led a letter with Congressman Bill Flores and more than 65 Members of Congress urging the House Appropriations Committee to withhold any funding for implementation of RHNDA in upcoming government spending bills. We will continue working on all fronts to combat this unconstitutional overreach and to ensure equal treatment under the law for those in the pro-life community. The First Amendment demands nothing less.”

Watch Congressman Black’s remarks on the House floor in support of H.J. Res. 43 HERE.  

Background: Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and other opponents of H.J. Res. 43 incorrectly claimed throughout debate on this measure that Rep. Black’s resolution would allow employers “to fire employees for using birth control, or in vitro fertilization, or any other reproductive health care service.” In truth, disapproval of RHNDA would not repeal the numerous layers of federal workplace protections for women regarding pregnancy, including those in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 

According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, “Title VII…prohibits discrimination based on the following: current pregnancy, past pregnancy, potential or intended pregnancy, medical conditions related to pregnancy or childbirth.”  The EEOC goes on to state, “For example, an employer could not discharge a female employee from her job because she uses contraceptives.”  These important protections remain in place for women in the District of Columbia even if RHNDAA is disapproved.

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Congressman Diane Black represents Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District. She has been a registered nurse for more than 40 years and serves on the House Ways and Means and Budget Committees

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Rep. Black Speaks In Support of House-Senate Balanced Budget Agreement

2015/05/01

Watch Congressman Black’s remarks HERE or by clicking the image above

Washington, DC– Today Congressman Diane Black (R-TN-06), one of the five House Republican negotiators named to the bicameral budget conference committee, spoke on the House floor to urge support of the House-Senate balanced budget agreement. To watch a video of Congressman Black’s remarks click here. A complete transcript is provided below:

Mister Speaker, what a difference a year makes. Since I came to Congress in 2011, my House Republican colleagues and I worked every year to pass a responsible, timely budget that confronts our runaway spending in Washington. But meanwhile, Senate Democrats refused to pass a budget during four of the last five years. That ends now.

This year, our new American Congress worked to pass a balanced budget in both the House and Senate and to then unify our budgets through regular order.

I had the distinct privilege of serving on the budget conference committee and I am pleased with the final product that we were able to deliver. This will mark the first balanced, joint budget resolution since 2001 and we did it without raising taxes.

But we didn’t stop there. This budget would also erase the President’s disastrous healthcare law, allowing us to start over on reforms that put patients and their doctors in charge – not Washington bureaucrats.

And we use the crucial reconciliation tool to help ensure an Obamacare repeal bill reaches the President’s desk so that we put him on record – forcing him to make a decision and defend that to the American people.

What’s more, this plan supports the growth of 1.2 million jobs over the next decade, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

Mister Speaker, as has been said many times before, budgets aren’t just a series of numbers – they are a statement of our values. I believe the priorities found in this budget are shared by my constituents, and reflect values that we can all be proud of.

I yield back my time.

Background:

Chairman Price and Chairman Enzi Announce Balanced Budget AgreementRep. Black Speaks at Opening Meeting of Budget Conference Committee

 

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Congressman Diane Black represents Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District. She has been a registered nurse for more than 40 years and serves on the House Ways and Means and Budget Committees

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Rep. Black Praises Planned House Vote on DC RHNDA Resolution of Disapproval

2015/04/29

Washington, DC– Today Congressman Diane Black (R-TN-06) released the below statement on the news that the House will hold a vote this week on H.J. Res. 43, her resolution to formally disapprove of the District of Columbia’s misnamed Reproductive Health Nondiscrimination Act (RHNDA)an unconstitutional measure that could force pro-life organizations in DC to hire personnel that disagree with their mission and potentially pay for abortion in their healthcare plans.

“The RHNDA law is fundamentally dishonest,” said Congressman Diane Black. “While the law’s supporters in the big-abortion lobby claim that this act protects against discrimination, the truth is this oppressive measure directly targets the First Amendment freedoms of pro-life and faith-based employers in our nation’s capital. Congress has a Constitutional duty to ensure that our laws are upheld in the District of Columbia and we would be shirking our duties as legislators to allow this discriminatory ‘nondiscrimination’ act to go unchallenged. I commend House leadership for calling a vote on my resolution and I will continue fighting tooth and nail to stop this shameful attack on religious freedom.”

To read Congressman Black’s original statement on the introduction of H.J. Res. 43 click HERE.

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Congressman Diane Black represents Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District. She has been a registered nurse for more than 40 years and serves on the House Ways and Means and Budget Committees

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Op-Ed: Why I Reintroduced the FIREARM Act - No Citizen Should Have to Play "20 Questions" to Own a Gun

2015/04/23


Rep. Black Honors 150th Anniversary of Sumner County Church

2015/04/22

Watch Congressman Black's remarks HERE or by clicking the image above 

Washington, DC– This week Congressman Diane Black (R-TN-06) took to the House floor to honor First Baptist Church of East Winchester Street in her hometown of Gallatin on the occasion of its 150th anniversary. In her remarks, Black noted her family’s frequent visits to the church over the years and her personal friendship with Pastor Derrick L. Jackson. Congressman Black is coordinating with the church to present an official copy of the remarks later this year.

To watch a video of Congressman Black’s floor speech, click here. A full transcript is also provided below:

Mister Speaker, it isn’t often that Members can take to the House floor to share good news – but this morning I have an opportunity to do just that. Today, I rise to honor the 150th anniversary of First Baptist Church on East Winchester Street in my hometown of Gallatin.

Founded in 1865 by a former slave named Robert Belote, First Baptist Church is a congregation steeped in history and poised to continue changing hearts and changing lives for many years to come.

Their mission is to be a “church of welcome” and over the years they have certainly lived up to that goal. In the beginning, their congregation was known as Union Church because they welcomed ex-slaves from all denominations – Catholic, Baptist, Presbyterian – no matter your background or your upbringing there was a place for all God’s children within their pews.

The church has been destroyed multiple times over the years – first by heavy winds and then by fire – but they always rebuilt and reemerged stronger than before. They weathered the Reconstruction era following the Civil War, the economic uncertainty of the Great Depression, and the rise and fall of the Jim Crowe- south. They are truly a testament to Christ’s promise in the Gospel of Matthew when he proclaimed “Upon this rock I will build my church and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.”

Today, the church’s attendance has climbed to approximately 1,000 people. I have had the opportunity to join friends and neighbors at First Baptist Church for worship on many occasions. I have sat under the powerful teaching of their pastor, and my dear friend, Rev. Derrick Jackson. And I can tell you that, 150 years later, God is still doing a mighty work in the life of this special community of believers. 

I am thankful for how First Baptist Church has personally ministered to me and so many others in our community. I wish them many years of continued growth and prosperity.

I yield back my time.

Background:The Tennessean: Founded by ex-slaves, First Baptist marks 150 years on same landFirst Baptist Church-East Winchester Street website

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Congressman Diane Black represents Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District. She has been a registered nurse for more than 40 years and serves on the House Ways and Means and Budget Committees

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Op-Ed: Let Tennesseans Deduct Sales Tax on Federal Tax Return

2015/04/22


Rep. Black Speaks at Opening Meeting of Budget Conference Committee

2015/04/20

 

Watch Congressman Black’s remarks at the budget conference committee HERE or by clicking the image above.

Washington, DC– Today Congressman Diane Black (R-TN-06) attended and spoke at the first meeting of the bicameral budget conference committee. Congressman Black was one of only five House Republican conferees appointed to this select committee tasked with reconciling differences between the House and Senate passed budgets to create a unified budget document.

In her remarks, Congressman Black discussed the importance of including language to repeal Obamacare in the final budget agreement. To watch a video of Congressman Black’s remarks click here. A complete transcript is provided below:

Good afternoon. Let me begin by saying what an honor it is to serve on this conference committee as we begin the important work of adopting a unified budget agreement that will confront our spending problem and return us to a point of fiscal solvency here in Washington. 

We know that the stakes are high, and the challenges are big, but we can also be encouraged by the knowledge that our House and Senate passed budgets already reflect many of the same core principles. That is important because, as we’ve all heard said before, budgets truly are a statement of our values.

So I’m pleased that the House and Senate Republican budgets agree on the importance of a plan that balances within ten years. We agree that we shouldn’t take more from hardworking families to fuel Washington’s runaway spending with another tax increase. We agree that we must offer Americans a way out from the harmful regulations, mandates, and costs of Obamacare. And we agree that budgets aren’t an optional part of our jobs as legislators – they are a fundamental responsibility of governing.

I’m looking forward to working alongside my conferees in both parties and both chambers in the coming days to craft this bicameral budget agreement. During that time, I hope to have a productive conversation on each of the major tenets of our respective budget documents.

As a nurse for more than 40 years, I’m particularly interested in discussing how our budget can lay a vision for a better way forward on healthcare. We know that the President’s healthcare law is failing to live up to its most basic promises. I hear that in my town hall meetings across my 19 counties, in my visits with providers here in Washington, and in the phone calls and emails I receive on a daily basis.

The Congressional Budget Office says Obamacare will cost our economy the equivalent of more than 2 million full time jobs. And once it’s all said and done, those same estimates tell us that about 31 million Americans will remain uninsured. We have to do better. That is why our budget agreement repeals Obamacare in full, allowing us to start over with real reforms that put patients and their doctors in charge of health care decisions – not Washington bureaucrats. I believe it is critical that our final, unified budget document maintain these provisions.

If we truly want to offer real-world healthcare solutions that strengthen the doctor patient relationship, that let families keep more money in their pocket, and that protect our seniors – it starts with erasing the damage of Obamacare and offering a clean slate to work from. We have an opportunity through this budget process to do exactly that.

I’m looking forward to the important work ahead and want to especially thank Chairman Price and Chairman Enzi for their leadership on this effort. Thank you. 

 

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Congressman Diane Black represents Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District. She has been a registered nurse for more than 40 years and serves on the House Ways and Means and Budget Committees

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Republicans Assail Race Disclosures in Gun Purchases

2015/04/19


Legislators Reintroduce FIREARM Act to Expose Race, Ethnicity Requirements for Gun Purchases

2015/04/18


Congressman Black Talks Obamacare and Taxes

2015/04/17


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Contact Information

1531 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-4231
Fax 202-225-6887
black.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Budget

Ways and Means

As a nurse, small businesswoman and former educator, Congressman Diane Black brings a unique and dynamic perspective to her work in Congress. Diane’s faith in America’s promise was shaped from an early age. The middle daughter of working-class, Great Depression era parents, Diane saw firsthand their efforts to create a better life for their children through their pursuit of the American Dream.

First elected to Congress in 2010, Black represents Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District, which includes 19 counties in middle Tennessee. Black is driven by her Christian faith and an unwavering commitment to restore fiscal sanity in Washington, enact market-based health care reform, and return America to its founding principles of limited government and a strong free enterprise system.

Black serves on the House Ways and Means Committee and has quickly established herself as a leader in the efforts to fundamentally reform the U.S. tax code for the first time in over 25 years. Black is fighting for a flatter, fairer and simpler tax code to help create the conditions for economic growth, job creation, and higher wages for American workers. In the 113th Congress, Black was selected to chair the Ways and Means Education and Family Benefits Tax Reform Working Group.

Through her over 40 years of experience working in the health care field, Black learned first-hand about the importance of high-quality care and the obstacles faced by patients, health care providers and employers. Black’s real world experiences as a nurse have uniquely positioned her as a credible and effective leader on health care policy in Congress. She is focused on dismantling the president’s health care law and advancing true market-based, patient-centered reforms that will bring down the rising cost of care by increasing private sector competition and consumer choice. In the 112th Congress, Black was the first member of Congress to have legislation signed into law that repeals a health care provision in Obamacare, which saved taxpayers $13 billion dollars.

Black is also a member of the House Budget Committee, and a co-author of the 2014 Path to Prosperity budget, which balances the federal budget within ten years, reduces federal spending by $4.6 trillion, saves Medicare for future generations and promotes private sector economic growth. Black is a firm believer that getting America’s fiscal house in order also requires serious reforms of the broken Congressional Budget process. That is why she introduced the Legally Binding Budget Act, H.R. 1868, and has been a leading advocate for initiatives such as the Balanced Budget Amendment to the Constitution and the No Budget, No Pay Act, H.R. 325, which withholds pay from Congress if an annual budget is not passed by the legal deadline.

Building off her work in the Tennessee legislature as a pro-life leader, Black has continued to fight for the rights of the unborn. Her first piece of legislation in the 113th Congress, H.R. 217, would block any Title X federal funding from going to organizations that perform abortions, such as Planned Parenthood. Black is also the sponsor of the Health Care Conscience Rights Act, H.R. 940, legislation that would protect the religious freedom of health care providers who refuse to perform abortions and offers full exemption from the Health and Human Services (HHS) employee healthcare mandate that requires coverage for abortion inducing drugs.

Black and her husband of over 30 years, Dr. David Black have three grown children and six grandchildren.  They live in Gallatin and attend Community Church in Hendersonville.


Serving With

Phil Roe

TENNESSEE's 1st DISTRICT

John Duncan

TENNESSEE's 2nd DISTRICT

Chuck Fleischmann

TENNESSEE's 3rd DISTRICT

Scott DesJarlais

TENNESSEE's 4th DISTRICT

Marsha Blackburn

TENNESSEE's 7th DISTRICT

Stephen Fincher

TENNESSEE's 8th DISTRICT

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