Committee on Education and the Workforce

John Kline

Subcommittee Explores Ways to Improve Support for Disadvantaged College Students

2015/04/30

The Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training, chaired by Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC), today held a hearing to learn about efforts to improve higher education access and completion for low-income and first-generation students. Members discussed possible reforms to existing federal programs and how efforts at the institutional level can positively affect educational outcomes for disadvantaged students.

“This is a very personal issue for me. As someone who grew up in extreme poverty, I know firsthand what it takes to earn a degree in difficult circumstances as well as what that degree means for one’s opportunity for advancement,” Chairwoman Foxx said. “For many students, however, the idea of graduating feels like a distant dream. Higher costs, a confusing financial aid system, and insufficient academic preparation disproportionately deter low-income and first-generation students from accessing and completing a higher education.”

Addressing the challenges facing these disadvantaged students “requires a multi-faceted, comprehensive approach and commitment from multiple players,” advised Laura Perna, Director of the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy at the University of Pennsylvania.

Annually, the federal government invests more than one billion dollars in access and completion programs for low-income and first-generation students. Perna continued, “to maximize the return on investment in [these] programs, we need to know more about what components and services work, for which groups of students, in which context.”

Associate Vice Provost for Student Diversity at the University of California, Los Angeles, Charles Alexander, who oversees the university’s Academic Advancement Program (AAP), discussed his efforts to improve educational outcomes, urging institutions to build community partnerships and share best practices. Largely because of AAP’s ongoing efforts, Alexander testified, “African Americans and Latinos graduate at the highest rate ever … many AAP graduates continue their education by going into Ph.D. programs or professional degree programs … and a large number of AAP graduates focus their work on serving the poor and under-served.”

Chancellor of the Dallas County Community Colleges District (DCCCD) Joe May agreed with witnesses. Institutions should pursue “partnerships with other community organizations that are supporting the needs of similar populations,” he said. For example, the DCCCD’s efforts to share best practices within a state-wide organization, Texas Completes, “have led to an increase of 42 percent in certificates and an increase of 33 percent in associate degrees” since 2010.

“We have a responsibility to students, families, and taxpayers to ensure all of our investments in higher education deliver the intended results,” Chairwoman Foxx concluded. “As we work to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, we want to … study the effectiveness of existing strategies so that more disadvantaged students can achieve the dream of a higher education.”

To learn more about the Education and the Workforce Committee’s efforts to strengthen higher education, visit http://edworkforce.house.gov/highered/.

To learn more about today’s hearing, read witness testimony, or to watch an archived webcast, visit www.edworkforce.house.gov/hearings.

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Foxx Statement: Hearing on “Improving College Access and Completion for Low-Income and First-Generation Students”

2015/04/30

I’d like to thank our witnesses for joining us to discuss strategies for improving postsecondary access and completion for low-income and first-generation students. We appreciate the opportunity to learn from you as Congress works to reauthorize the Higher Education Act.

This is a very personal issue for me. As someone who grew up in extreme poverty, I know firsthand what it takes to earn a degree in difficult circumstances as well as what that degree means for one’s opportunity for advancement. Some of the most rewarding experiences I have had as an educator involved helping disadvantaged students overcome obstacles to reach their goals and achieve success.

The Education and the Workforce Committee has held more than a dozen hearings about how to strengthen America’s higher education system for all those who choose to pursue a degree or credential – regardless of age, background, or circumstances.

Research shows students who attain advanced levels of education are more likely to succeed in today’s economy. For example, students who earn an associate’s degree are expected to earn 27 percent more than their peers with a high school diploma over the course of a lifetime.

For many students, however, the idea of graduating feels like a distant dream. Higher costs, a confusing financial aid system, and insufficient academic preparation disproportionately deter low-income and first-generation students from accessing and completing a higher education.

Recognizing the challenges facing these students, the federal government invests in numerous programs geared toward identifying and supporting disadvantaged students and the institutions that serve them. In addition to providing students need-based financial assistance, such as Pell Grants, the federal government also provides early outreach and support services to help students progress from middle school through college.

Programs such as GEAR UP and Upward Bound receive more than one billion of taxpayer dollars to support tutoring, family financial counseling, internships, research opportunities, and other preparatory and motivational services – all with the goal of improving access for low-income and first-generation students.

And our efforts don’t stop there. Because improving the educational outcomes for disadvantaged students is an important priority, the federal government directly supports institutions that focus on serving underrepresented students in an effort to help them complete a higher education.

While these efforts are well intentioned, there is a growing concern they are not reaching their goals. For example, according to a study published earlier this year by one of our witnesses, Dr. Laura Perna, the percentage of low-income students who have attained a bachelor’s degree has increased by just 3 percent since 1970. By comparison, the percentage of the wealthiest students who attained a bachelor’s degree has increased by 40 percent.

In other words, despite the federal government’s growing investment in access and completion programs over the last five decades, graduation rates for the most disadvantaged students have barely budged.

We have a responsibility to students, families, and taxpayers to ensure all of our investments in higher education deliver the intended results. Understanding how to strengthen these efforts for low-income and first-generation students is why our witnesses are here today. As we work to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, we want to learn about your efforts to pioneer new strategies and study the effectiveness of existing strategies so that more disadvantaged students can achieve the dream of a higher education.  

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Time to Modernize Multiemployer Pension System

2015/04/29

The Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions, chaired by Rep. Phil Roe (R-TN), today held a hearing to discuss ways to further strengthen the multiemployer pension system. The hearing, entitled, “Examining Reforms to Modernize the Multiemployer Pension System," follows a bipartisan proposal enacted into law last year that includes policies to shore up the federal backstop for multiemployer plans and provide the trustees of these plans new tools to avoid insolvency.

“Today’s hearing represents the next step in a long process to strengthen the retirement security of America’s workers,” remarked Chairman Roe. “This effort began more than three years ago for a simple reason: A pension crisis threatened the well-being of countless workers, employers, and retirees, as well as American taxpayers ... Through our continued oversight, it has become abundantly clear that workers need new options to help plan for their retirement.”

“We need new tools in our toolbox to address the challenges which were not contemplated when multiemployer pension rules were initially put in place,” said Andrew Scoggin, Vice President of Albertson’s LLC. “Congress needs to equip employers and employees with the regulatory flexibility necessary to make changes to benefits programs that do not run afoul of beneficiaries, their employers, or the system as a whole.”

To help accomplish this goal, in 2013, the National Coordinating Committee for Multiemployer Plans (NCCMP) released a proposal that would allow for the creation of so-called “composite” plans. These innovative plans would combine aspects of both defined benefit and defined contribution plans to deliver annuitized, lifetime income without the drawbacks associated with traditional multiemployer plans.

Randy DeFrehn, Executive Director of the NCCMP, described the composite plan model as the “next logical step in the evolution” of multiemployer plans. DeFrehn added, “The composite plan provides the best of both worlds. If enacted, the structure and safeguards will provide greater long-term retirement security by creating a path for contributing employers to remain in and new employers to enter the multiemployer system without presenting existential risks, while providing the greatest possible benefit for covered participants.”
 
Speaking in support of NCCMP’s proposal, Steve Sandherr of the Associated General Contractors of America testified, “We think Congress should allow collective bargaining parties or plan trustees the option to decide whether to adopt the composite plan model, which more equally distributes some of the risks associated with retirement plans so employers don’t have to shoulder the entire burden … the new plan design is essential to the shared goal of protecting both those who earn benefits and those employers that contribute retirement benefits to them.”

Mark McManus, General Secretary-Treasurer of United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, echoed this sentiment: “From the perspective of the United Association, the most important feature is that these plans provide for the accumulation of benefits and provide a life time benefit in a manner similar to traditional defined benefit plans.” McManus continued, “The opportunity for creative solutions to our retirement income dilemma is within our grasp. We strongly encourage Congress to take advantage of it …”

Chairman Roe and other members noted their intention to do just that. “It is easy to find areas of disagreement on this subcommittee,” concluded Chairman Roe, “especially as we address policies so central to the well-being of the American people. But I have always appreciated the bipartisan approach the committee has taken on this important issue, and I pledge to do my part to continue that tradition in the work that lies ahead.”

To learn more about today’s hearing, read witness testimony, or to watch an archived webcast, visit www.edworkforce.house.gov/hearings.

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Roe Statement: Hearing on "Protecting America’s Workers: An Enforcement Update from the Mine Safety and Health Administration"

2015/04/29

Today’s hearing represents the next step in a long process to strengthen the retirement security of America’s workers by reforming the multiemployer pension system. This effort began more than three years ago for a simple reason: A pension crisis threatened the well-being of countless workers, employers, and retirees, as well as American taxpayers.

Without congressional action, this crisis would have forced businesses to close their doors and lay off workers, retirees would have had their benefits cut, if not wiped out entirely, and taxpayers would have been on the hook for a multi-billion dollar bailout of a bankrupt pension system. As a nation, and more specifically, as elected policymakers, we had a responsibility to act.

That is why this subcommittee convened numerous hearings and called more than a dozen witnesses – including employers, union leaders, administration officials, and retiree advocates – in order to thoroughly examine the challenges facing the system and discuss possible solutions.

As part of this effort, in the spring of 2014, Chairman Kline discussed four key principles necessary for any serious, responsible reform of the system. Those principles included protecting taxpayers, encouraging greater employer participation, and providing trustees new tools to restore troubled plans back to financial health.

At the time of the chairman’s remarks, only one proposal embodied all four principles, and that was the proposal crafted by the National Coordinating Committee for Multiemployer Plans or NCCMP. A coalition of management and labor representatives organized by NCCMP spent months crafting a consensus proposal that would give trustees the best shot they had to save dying pension plans without a taxpayer bailout. No one else came forward with a credible plan to responsibly reform the system.

The NCCMP proposal became the framework for a bipartisan legislative solution the president signed into law last December. This new law extended funding rules put in place almost a decade ago, raised premiums to improve the financial outlook of the federal backstop for multiemployer pension plans, and allowed trustees to adjust benefits as a last resort to rescue a plan from insolvency.

This was not an easy thing to do, but doing nothing would have been far worse. Regardless of whether we did or didn’t act, retirees in badly failing plans were going to have their benefits cut. That’s the harsh reality we were forced to confront, and the choice we faced was to either watch the federal government inflict maximum pain on the maximum number of individuals, or provide more flexibility to save these plans and ensure retirees are better off.

George Miller, former congressman from California and senior Democrat of our committee, described these bipartisan reforms this way: “The approach we have put forward, which is backed by business and labor leaders, will secure the multiemployer pension systems for millions of current and future retirees.”

Congressman Miller urged his colleagues to “trust these workers enough to give them this opportunity and this responsibility to make these decisions about their retirement.” That is precisely what we did, and as difficult as it was, it was the right thing to do.

Now, it is time to complete this important effort. One principle I neglected to mention earlier in is the subject of today’s hearing: Modernizing the multiemployer pension system. Through our continued oversight, it has become abundantly clear that workers need new options to help plan for their retirement.

As part of its work, NCCMP devised a new “composite” pension plan design, combining aspects of both defined benefit and defined contribution plans. The goal of the proposal was to deliver annuitized, lifetime income without the drawbacks associated with traditional multiemployer defined benefit plans.

For example, many plans face unfunded liabilities that threaten the retirement security of their participants. Current rules discourages employers from agreeing to participate in the system and poses a financial burden for those who do. Finally, despite improvements resulting from the new law, the federal backstop for these plans continues to face fiscal challenges in meeting its modest benefit guarantees.

Our witnesses today will describe these and other shortcomings. They will also explain how the composite plan design could address these concerns while providing robust, well-funded retirement benefits for America’s working families.

I look forward to our discussion, and more importantly, to finishing this important effort. It is easy to find areas of disagreement on this subcommittee, especially as we address policies so central to the well-being of the American people. But I have always appreciated the bipartisan approach the committee has taken on this important issue, and I pledge to do my part to continue that tradition in the work that lies ahead.

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***MEDIA ADVISORY*** Subcommittee to Discuss Efforts to Improve Support for Disadvantaged College Students

2015/04/28

On Thursday, April 30 at 10:00 a.m., the Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training Subcommittee, chaired by Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC), will hold a hearing entitled, “Improving College Access and Completion for Low-Income and First-Generation Students.” The hearing will take place in room 2175 of the Rayburn House Office Building.
       
The federal government invests in numerous programs intended to improve college access and completion for low-income and first-generation students. A number of states and institutions also provide enhanced support services for these disadvantaged students. Some schools have implemented additional counseling programs to help students manage their coursework and degree costs. Others try to assess students’ needs and provide any necessary tutoring or curricula adjustments.
       
As the committee continues working to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, Thursday’s hearing will provide members an opportunity to explore institutional efforts to better serve low-income and first-generation students and discuss possible policy changes to strengthen federal programs geared toward helping these students obtain a postsecondary education.
         
To learn more about the hearing, visit http://edworkforce.house.gov/hearings

 

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WITNESS LIST

Dr. Laura Perna
James S. Riepe Professor
Executive Director for the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Charles J. Alexander
Associate Vice Provost for Student Diversity
Director for the Academic Advancement Program
University of California, Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Joe May
Chancellor
Dallas County Community College District
Dallas, TX

Dr. Michelle Asha Cooper
President
Institute for Higher Education Policy
Washington, D.C.

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***MEDIA ADVISORY*** Subcommittee to Discuss Reforms to Modernize the Multiemployer Pension System

2015/04/27

On Wednesday, April 29 at 2:00 p.m., the Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions, chaired by Rep. Phil Roe (R-TN), will hold a hearing on ways to strengthen the retirement security of America’s workers. The hearing, entitled, “Examining Reforms to Modernize the Multiemployer Pension System,” will take place in room 2175 of the Rayburn House Office Building.

In 2013, a coalition of labor unions and employers organized by the National Coordinating Committee for Multiemployer Plans (NCCMP) issued a report with numerous policy recommendations to address the significant challenges facing the multiemployer pension system. As part of its report, NCCMP devised a new “composite” pension plan design, combining aspects of both defined benefit and defined contribution plans. The goal of the proposal was to deliver annuitized, lifetime income without the drawbacks associated with traditional multiemployer defined benefit plans. Proponents argue the creation and adoption of composite plans would stop the exodus of employers from the multiemployer pension system and create a more sustainable retirement option for today’s workforce.

Wednesday’s hearing will provide members an opportunity to examine the challenges facing the multiemployer pension system and ways to improve the system on behalf of workers, employers, retirees, and taxpayers.

To learn more about the hearing, visit http://edworkforce.house.gov/hearings

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WITNESS LIST

Randy G. DeFrehn
Executive Director
National Coordinating Committee for Multiemployer Plans
Washington, DC

Mark McManus
General Secretary-Treasurer
United Association
Annapolis, MD

Steve Sandherr
Chief Executive Officer
Associated General Contractors of America
Arlington, VA

Andrew Scoggin
Executive Vice President
Human Resources, Labor Relations, Public Relations & Government Affairs
Albertsons LLC
Boise, ID

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“Improving College Access and Completion for Low-Income and First-Generation Students”

2015/04/23


Walberg Statement: Hearing on "Protecting America's Workers: An Enforcement Update from the Mine Safety and Health Administration"

2015/04/23

Today’s hearing is timely for two important reasons. First, in just a few days, our nation will observe Workers Memorial Day, a time to remember the men and women who have been injured or killed at work. It is also a time to reaffirm our commitment to tough, responsible policies that will help protect the health and safety of America’s workers.

And secondly, just a few weeks ago, the people of Montcoal, West Virginia, and neighbors in surrounding communities observed the five-year anniversary of the Upper Big Branch mining disaster. There is no doubt that the families of the 29 miners who died live each and every day with the painful memory of this tragic event. Our thoughts and prayers are with these families and every family that has lost a loved one while on the job.

Upper Big Branch is a terrible reminder that bad actors will look for ways to cut corners and jeopardize the well-being of their workers, despite a moral and legal obligation to make safety the number one priority. I am pleased that those who had a hand in the Upper Big Branch tragedy are being held responsible. It is taking some time, but justice is being served.

An independent report from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health underscored why bad actors must be held accountable. The report said: “If [the Mine Safety and Health Administration] had engaged in timely enforcement of the Mine Act and applicable standards and regulations, it would have lessened the chances of – and possibly could have prevented – the UBB explosion.”

That is why time and again this committee has urged MSHA to do better and use every tool it has to keep miners safe. Under your leadership, Assistant Secretary Main, the agency has implemented a number of changes to its regulatory and enforcement practices. The purpose of today’s hearing is to examine these efforts and determine whether they serve the best interests of America’s miners.

We have a lot of ground to cover in a short period of time, including controversial changes to the “pattern of violations” regulations, revised standards governing exposure to respirable coal dust, changes to the agency’s citations and penalty policies, and new rules on the use of proximity detectors on continuous mining machines.

Clearly, you have been busy, Assistant Secretary Main. As you know, we haven’t agreed on every issue, and when we haven’t, we’ve expressed our concerns and encouraged the agency to move in a different direction. However, when the agency does take responsible steps to improve health and safety enforcement, you have and will continue to have our full support.

Both your agency and this committee share the same goal: We want to ensure strong enforcement policies are in place so that every miner returns home to his or her loved ones at the end of their shift. I look forward to a frank and robust discussion today and continuing our work together to help reach that shared goal.

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Bungling Bureaucracy Plagues Indian Education

2015/04/22

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education, chaired by Rep. Todd Rokita (R-IN), today held a hearing to learn about the Bureau of Indian Education, housed under the Department of Interior, and the significant challenges facing the schools it has a responsibility to support.

“As reports from congressional committees, government watchdogs, investigative journalists, and academics have detailed, the state of [Native American] education is abysmal,” Chairman Rokita said. “Too many schools lack adequate infrastructure and educational resources, compromising the health, safety, and future postsecondary and professional opportunities of the children they are intended to serve. And it has been this way for far too long.”

“There is much room for improvement in the BIE system,” said National Congress of American Indians President, Brian Cladoosby. Explaining the disappointing history of federal Indian education policy, he continued, “At the very basic level, tribes are seeking the fulfillment of the … trust relationship with the federal government.”

As Minneapolis Star Tribune editorial writer and Pulitzer finalist Jill Burcum described in her four-part series on BIE schools entitled, “Separate and Unequal,” these vulnerable children were promised a quality education that preserves their heritage and have been forced to attend deplorable schools.

Falling ceilings, broken water heaters, and electrical hazards are just a few of the problems plaguing students and educators, Burcum noted at the hearing. “You’d think that conditions like this would inspire urgency at the federal agencies that oversee these schools,” she said. “They haven’t … there’s a longstanding defeatism within the [Department of] Interior about improving conditions at BIE schools and an entrenched, spread-out bureaucracy too often focused on red tape for red tape’s sake and not on progress.”

Education, Workforce, and Income Security Director at the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office, Melissa Emrey-Arras, described how “organizational fragmentation and poor communication” have inhibited the ability of the federal government to uphold its commitment to Native American children. She concluded, “Unless these issues are addressed, it will be difficult for Indian Affairs to ensure the long-term success of a generation of students.”

“Congress should demand action from the Department of Interior,” said Burcum. “The agency needs to overhaul its confusing, rigid bureaucracy.”

“Nobody can visit one of these schools and not say, ‘we need to fix this,’” remarked Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman John Kline (R-MN). “We have a bureaucratic mess. We all owe it to these kids to get past the confusing [bureaucracy] and stop saying it’s somebody else’s problem. It’s time now for it to be all of our responsibility.”

To learn more about today’s hearing, read witness testimony, or to watch an archived webcast, visit www.edworkforce.house.gov/hearings.

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Rokita Statement: Hearing on "Examining Challenges Facing Native American Schools"

2015/04/22

Nearly a century ago, the federal government made a promise to deliver to Native American children a quality education that preserves their customs and culture. Under the Department of Interior’s Bureau of Indian Education, the federal government is expected to support the education of more than 40,000 students through approximately 185 elementary and secondary schools located on or near Indian reservations.

Unfortunately, the federal government is failing to keep its promise to these vulnerable children.

As reports from congressional committees, government watchdogs, investigative journalists, and academics have detailed, the state of BIE education is abysmal. Too many schools lack adequate infrastructure and educational resources, compromising the health, safety, and future postsecondary and professional opportunities of the children they are intended to serve. And it has been this way for far too long.

A 1969 Senate report from the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare describes the federal government’s failure to provide an effective education as a “national tragedy and a national disgrace” that has “condemned the [American Indian] to a life of poverty and despair.”

Despite countless calls for change, all we have seen is decades of inaction. As one of today’s witnesses chronicles in an acclaimed Minneapolis Star Tribune series on the failing BIE system, “federal neglect [continues to handicap] learning at BIE schools nationwide … Kids shivering in thin-walled classrooms or studying under leaky roofs year after year aren’t getting the education they need or deserve.”

A report by the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office further details these concerns. Entitled the “Bureau of Indian Education Needs to Improve Oversight of School Spending,” the report reveals a chronic failure to fix and replace decrepit and antiquated schools. The GAO cites a bungling bureaucracy that includes a lack of information to effectively monitor and fix the problems plaguing school facilities, as well as confusion and poor communication about who is actually responsible for addressing the various needs of these schools.

The details of these reports are sobering. However, words on paper will never fully convey the troubling state of Native American education. That is why members of the Education and the Workforce Committee have visited these schools to learn firsthand about the challenges they face.

This year, I have visited several BIE schools, including the Theodore Roosevelt Indian School and John F. Kennedy Indian School in Arizona with BIE director Dr. Monty Roessel, as well as the Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig School in Minnesota with Chairman John Kline.

The conditions at these schools are deplorable. Some classrooms lack desks, books, computers, pencils, and paper, while others lack proper flooring, roofing, and ventilation. Some schools are missing a working water heater. Others are missing front doors and are rodent-infested. And for many students, attending these unsafe and unhealthy schools is their only option.

Despite the many obstacles that stand in the way of these students and educators, their resiliency and determination to create better lives for themselves is nothing short of inspiring. They understand the importance of an education and the opportunities it will afford them. I’ve also met dedicated teachers and school administrators who are working hard to overcome these challenging conditions and help improve the lives of their students with quality educational opportunities.

It is paramount that we uphold our promise to provide Native American children an excellent education that preserves their tribal heritage. Though the current system poses significant challenges, turning a blind eye is not the answer. The federal government must live up to its responsibility.

We look forward to learning from our witnesses about the Bureau of Indian Education and the schools under BIE’s jurisdiction. I am confident today’s hearing will help advance real solutions that ensure Native American children have access to safe and healthy schools that support quality teaching and learning. 

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"Examining Reforms to Modernize the Multiemployer Pension System"

2015/04/22


***MEDIA ADVISORY*** Subcommittee to Examine Challenges Facing Native American Schools

2015/04/20

On Wednesday, April 22 at 10:00 a.m., the Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Rep. Todd Rokita (R-IN), will hold a hearing entitled “Examining the Challenges Facing Native American Schools.” The hearing will take place in room 2175 of the Rayburn House Office Building.

The federal government, primarily through the Departments of the Interior and Education, provides financial assistance for children on Indian reservations and Native American children in public schools to ensure they receive a quality education comparable to their peers. The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), housed under the Department of Interior’s Office of Indian Affairs, provides direct education to approximately 41,000 students through 185 elementary and secondary schools located on or near Indian reservations. Of these schools, 126 schools are operated by tribes through BIE grants, while 59 schools are directly operated by the BIE.

According to the Government Accountability Office, BIE-administered schools spend 56 percent more per student than traditional public schools and graduation and student achievement rates are consistently below the national average. Additionally, an investigative series by the Minneapolis Star Tribune found many schools are in severe disrepair without adequate facilities and educational resources.

Wednesday’s hearing will give members an opportunity to learn more the Bureau of Indian Education and the challenges facing Native American schools. For more information on hearings, visit edworkforce.house.gov/hearings.

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WITNESS LIST

Ms. Jill Burcum
Editorial Writer
Minneapolis Star Tribune 
Minneapolis, MN

Mr. Brian Cladoosby
President
National Congress of American Indians
Washington, D.C.  

Ms. Melissa Emrey-Arras
Director of Education, Workforce, and Income Security Issues
U.S. Government Accountability Office
Boston, MA

Mr. Quinton Roman Nose
Executive Director
Tribal Education Departments National Assembly
Boulder, CO.  

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“Protecting America’s Workers: An Enforcement Update from the Mine Safety and Health Administration"

2015/04/15


"Examining the Challenges Facing Native American Schools"

2015/04/15


"Serving Students and Families through Child Nutrition Programs"

2015/04/08


"Five Years of Broken Promises: How the President's Health Care Law is Affecting America's Workplaces"

2015/04/07


H.R. 548, "Certainty in Enforcement Act of 2015"; H.R. 549, "Litigation Oversight Act of 2015"; H.R. 550, "EEOC Transparency and Accountability Act"; and H.R. 1189, "Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act."

2015/03/17


“Reviewing the President’s Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Proposal for the Department of Labor”

2015/03/11


"Strengthening America’s Higher Education System"

2015/03/10


H.J. Res. 29, Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of the rule submitted by the National Labor Relations Board relating to representation case procedures

2014/11/17


There is no media available for this committee.

Contact Information

2181 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-4527
Fax 202-225-9571
edworkforce.house.gov


Membership

Rick Allen

GEORGIA's 12th DISTRICT

Louis Barletta

PENNSYLVANIA's 11th DISTRICT

Mike Bishop

MICHIGAN's 8th DISTRICT

Dave Brat

VIRGINIA's 7th DISTRICT

Bradley Byrne

ALABAMA's 1st DISTRICT

Buddy Carter

GEORGIA's 1st DISTRICT

Carlos Curbelo

FLORIDA's 26th DISTRICT

Virginia Foxx

NORTH CAROLINA's 5th DISTRICT

Glenn Grothman

WISCONSIN's 6th DISTRICT

Brett Guthrie

KENTUCKY's 2nd DISTRICT

Joe Heck

NEVADA's 3rd DISTRICT

Duncan Hunter

CALIFORNIA's 50th DISTRICT

John Kline

MINNESOTA's 2nd DISTRICT

Luke Messer

INDIANA's 6th DISTRICT

Phil Roe

TENNESSEE's 1st DISTRICT

Todd Rokita

INDIANA's 4th DISTRICT

Steve Russell

OKLAHOMA's 5th DISTRICT

Matt Salmon

ARIZONA's 5th DISTRICT

Elise Stefanik

NEW YORK's 21st DISTRICT

Glenn Thompson

PENNSYLVANIA's 5th DISTRICT

Tim Walberg

MICHIGAN's 7th DISTRICT

Joe Wilson

SOUTH CAROLINA's 2nd DISTRICT